46 Comments
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

Great post, the visual difference between the first and second graphs you posted could be a litmus test for statistical illiteracy. Not once did the NYT show graph 1, it was always graph 2.

Expand full comment
author

Exactly right.

Why did it take someone like me to wonder about and obtain some of these data via FOIA? Where were the math-literate journalists?

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

Worse, the readers didn't care. I'm stunned by the complete lack of curiosity.

Expand full comment
author
Nov 4, 2022·edited Nov 4, 2022Author

When data like this is on a big screen in Fauci’s trial, they may finally get it.

Expand full comment

Fabulous work. What a man-made-disaster this was, wow.

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

So if there had been no mainstream coverage, would we look back at NYC as a Covid problem area, a lockdown/pandemic response problem, or no problem at all (high-normal cold/flu season)?

Expand full comment
author

IMO, we wouldn’t have looked at it at all.

Nothing to notice.

Expand full comment
author

To your question on twitter about the abrupt disappearance of flu…here’s a related question:

Look at respiratory ED visits in NYC. Why were they so low during covid’s “dominance”?

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022·edited Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

A few additional notes to your excellent report.

You can go to the video w/Nurse Erin and she will show you directly on the screen that patients at Elmhurst were given a "Covid" diagnosis even as it quite clear they tested 'negative.'

Nicole Sirotek who worked at two NYC hospitals during this time was treating numerous patients coming in to and stated that she did not see one "Covid" patient amongst the many she treated and saw being treated but ALL of them were listed as "Covid" for obvious reasons.

It is also of note that even as recorded by the CDC anxiety was the 2nd or 3rd leading comorbidity in their listing of "Covid deaths"- which is rife with fraud.

And of course all of these "Covid" diagnoses are either made up whole cloth by those in the hospitals who are mandated to call everything "Covid" (for $$$) and/or are determined to be "Covid" by PCR which can't diagnose anything.

It's fraud piled on fraud.

Expand full comment
author

I think the fraud has been in the cover-up, not from fraud that was planning at the outset.

I'll talk about this more in a future post. I'm building toward that point, as you can probably tell.

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

This sentence: "We’d expect less-healthy, more vulnerable people to be hospitalized for & with covid, but these numbers and age distribution don’t mesh well with recent estimates of the pre-vax infection fatality ratio."

The final table indicates that up to 3 thousand of the 15,004 covid deaths in spring 2020 could've been people in their 50s. That is out of line with the age distribution you'd expect. I'd also expect a sharper gradient upward for number of deaths in the 3 oldest age groups.

Expand full comment
author

Way out of line. Who were those people? Not nursing home residents, that’s for sure.

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

Del Bigtree talked about this panic effect on his show The Highwire. I think it was back in 2020 actually, or early in 2021.

Expand full comment
author

The data supports the theory, overwhelmingly.

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

Observation Two fits the evidence we've seen of the power of suggestion. Many New Yorkers thought of covid every time they sneezed or coughed in March and April 2020.

Expand full comment
author

Yep. And many New Yorkers (and Americans) STILL believe that NYC was just “hit harder” by the virus than everyone else, and simply “got the virus under control.”

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

It's pretty remarkable how the entire country was terrorized with horror stories from NYC. And apparently no one who knew what was going on dared to tell the truth.

Expand full comment
author

I’m not sure that any one person knew what was going on at every level.

Expand full comment

Motivation? Perhaps the endless flow of a government paid bounty for every COVID coded diagnosis...

Expand full comment

Did these hospitals set up respiratory tents though? I ask because I work ICU and occasionally in ER; we directed anyone whose primary complaint was respiratory to the tent setups (drive through and walk in). Anyone admitted to the hospital via the tent was a direct admit from an urgent care setting. We did get some Covids to the nursing floor via ER, but their primary issue would have been trauma, stroke, MI, etc

Expand full comment
author

You work in an NYC hospital, you’re saying?

Expand full comment

No! I apologize; I’m in illinois. I can’t speak to how other states did it; I just brought it up because ER visits here would have skewed your data due to the tents and how CMS dictated billing for those visits. You might be able to parse data from the CMS website that would give you a decent picture, but I think it would be mostly billing code based.

https://www.cms.gov/files/document/03092020-covid-19-faqs-508.pdf

Expand full comment
author

I’m in Illinois too. I still don’t see what you’re saying.

Do you mean that use of tents for ED visit triage would’ve affected the daily ED visit totals?

Expand full comment

Every hospital that accepts Medicare/Medicaid would be operating under the public health emergency waiver from CMS, so if you wanted to look at data from CMS/DHS, it might give you more information directly related to the number of individual visits via ICD code. I am not sure off the top of my head if each patient got a diagnostic test code plus an urgent care visit if they were admitted, or if it was bundled. I think if someone met admission criteria the only thing the hospital can bill for is the admission, not admission plus lab test plus visit

Expand full comment

But for a few months that spring, I can tell you our ER was pretty dead most of the time. Not as many car wrecks because people weren’t driving as much, no sports injuries, etc.

Expand full comment

Yes. We didn’t want people with respiratory symptoms coming into the ER and having to wait in those areas because we had no good way to keep nonrespiratory patients separate while waiting. We were operating under a PHE Waiver (https://www.natlawreview.com/article/cms-hospitals-without-walls-waiver-looking-to-ascs-to-provide-relief) which allows billing in an alternative setting

Expand full comment
author

I don’t see how this would affect the ED visit data

Expand full comment
Nov 4, 2022Liked by Jessica Hockett

Your finding that the ER visits were actually lower makes sense, though - because nearly all respiratory patients were tent patients.

Expand full comment
author

can you name your hospital?

Expand full comment
author

ED visits were lower in NYC (and Chicago and everywhere) because ED visits were lower. People stayed away from the hospital, because they were told to do so. Respiratory visits in NYC were an exception, but my contention is the spike was panic-indicted. I still don’t see how the tents-as-overflow relates to the data.

Expand full comment